China’s military plan advances, collaborates with scientists to make drones to replace humans in complex overseas missions

A unit of the PLA in Chengdu, southwest China, has disclosed its collaboration with a team of scientists to create cutting-edge drones designed to replace human agents in complicated overseas missions within the next decade.

In an ambitious venture that blurs the lines between fiction and reality, a unit of the People’s Liberation Army (PLA) in Chengdu, southwest China, has disclosed its collaboration with a team of scientists to create cutting-edge drones designed to replace human agents in complicated overseas missions within the next decade. This development emphasizes the stride of China in military technology, bringing forth unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) with unparalleled capabilities.

The PLA’s Chengdu unit has been working closely to revolutionize special forces missions, where operatives traditionally face the daunting challenge of slipping in unnoticed, executing precise strikes, and withdrawing without leaving any trace.

The unveiled UAV possesses noteworthy capabilities, allowing it to traverse vast distances, submerge underwater to significant depths, and patiently wait for extended periods. Upon receiving a command, it can flawlessly emerge from the water, swiftly move towards its target, execute its mission, and retreat unnoticed beneath the waves, evading detection.

The focus on developing drones for overseas operations corresponds with the government of China’s long-standing non-interference policy in other nations’ internal affairs. China’s military has traditionally maintained a veil of secrecy surrounding its overseas operations, and the revelation of this collaborative effort between the military and scientists throws light on China’s strides in autonomous warfare capabilities.

Through the recently published paper in the Fire Control and Command Control journal, the PLA’s 78092 unit, involved in the project, disclosed some details regarding a future hypothetical overseas special operations plan. It was argued that revealing this theoretical plan would help companies in China, engineers, and also scientists who are looking for and developing new UAVs to know and understand better the needs of the military and strategic goals.

The advanced intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems must allow the drones to impend over the battlefield after the commencing attack, assess the damage, and determine if further action is required. The drones must be capable of eliminating the enemy forces if they attempt to flee. The PLA team stated that the new UAV development was inspired by the approach of the US military. China has the world’s largest civilian UAV factories that are technologically highly advanced. However, most civilian UAV suppliers in China have not yet entered the military market.

The development in Chengdu emphasizes China’s commitment to maintaining technological parity or even superiority in the global military landscape. The unveiling of these sophisticated drones marks a significant milestone in China’s pursuit of cutting-edge military technology, challenging traditional paradigms of special forces operations. As per the 78092 unit, the special ops drone project has already landed.