Deadly train collision in India’s West Bengal kills at least 15

The incident occurred on Monday morning when a freight train collided with the Kanchanjunga Express passenger train in the Darjeeling district, near New Jalpaiguri station.

A train accident in India’s eastern state of West Bengal has claimed the lives of at least 15 people and left dozens injured. The incident occurred on Monday morning when a freight train collided with the Kanchanjunga Express passenger train in the Darjeeling district, near New Jalpaiguri station.

Abhishek Roy, a senior police official in Darjeeling, confirmed to Reuters that at least 15 bodies have been recovered from the wreckage. The collision has also resulted in nearly 30 injuries, with rescue operations ongoing.

Sabyasachi De, spokesperson for the Northeast Frontier Railway, reported that three of the deceased were railway personnel. The cause of the accident is preliminarily attributed to human error, though investigations are ongoing.

Response efforts are in full swing, with rescue teams from the police and national disaster response force working alongside local doctors and residents to clear debris from the derailed carriages. West Bengal’s Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee announced on social media that doctors, ambulances, and disaster teams have been dispatched to the crash site.

This incident highlights the persistent safety concerns in India’s extensive railway network, which sees hundreds of accidents annually. India’s railways, which transport millions of passengers daily, have been the focus of ongoing government efforts to improve safety and efficiency. However, incidents like this underscore the magnitude of the task and the urgent need for comprehensive reforms.

As rescue and recovery efforts continue in West Bengal, authorities are expected to launch a thorough investigation into the circumstances leading to this deadly collision. The incident serves as a stark reminder of the critical importance of railway safety measures and the potential consequences of human error in transportation systems.