From glory to grief: INS Sindhuraj (S57) and INS Sindhuratna (S59) – stories of naval strength and tragedy

The Indian Navy’s powerful Sindhughosh-class diesel-electric submarines include INS Sindhuraj (S57), the “King of the Sea,” and INS Sindhuratna (S59), the “Jewel of the Sea.” They exemplify maritime strength with their tremendous size and superior capabilities.

INS Sindhuraj (S57):

INS Sindhuraj (S57), often known as the “King of the Sea,” is part of the Indian Navy’s Sindhughosh class of diesel-electric submarines. 

General Characteristics:

It has a length of 72.6 metres, a beam of 9.9 metres, and a draught of 6.6 metres. The submarine’s propulsion system includes two 3,650 hp diesel-electric engines, one 5,900 hp motor, two 204 hp auxiliary motors, and one 130 hp economic speed motor. This design enables the submarine to reach 11 knots when surfaced, 9 knots in snorkel mode, and 19 knots when submerged.

In terms of range, the INS Sindhuraj can travel 6,000 miles at 7 mph while snorkelling and 400 miles at 3 knots when submerged. The submarine has amazing endurance, capable of being at sea for up to 45 days with a crew of 52.

The submarine is capable of operating at a test depth of 240 metres and a maximum depth of 300 metres. It has a complement of 52 people, including thirteen officers. The ship is equipped with a 9M36 Strela-3 (SA-N-8) surface-to-air missile launcher, a Klub-S (3M-54E) anti-ship cruise missile, Type 53-65 passive wake homing torpedoes, and TEST 71/76 anti-submarine active-passive homing torpedoes. Furthermore, the submarine may carry 24 DM-1 mines in place of torpedo tubes, increasing its adaptability in naval operations.

INS Sindhuratna (S59):

INS Sindhuratna (S59), a Sindhughosh-class diesel-electric submarine, has acquired the nickname “Jewel of the Sea” as a proud Indian Navy vessel. On February 26, 2014, disaster struck when smoke was found aboard the submarine off the coast of Mumbai. During a training operation, when the submarine was submerged, compartment No. 3 in the crew’s accommodation section caught fire. This incident resulted in the suffocation of 4-5 men, who were then transported to a Mumbai hospital, alongside the Western Naval Command’s senior-most submarine officer.

Unfortunately, the tragedy had serious effects, killing two people and injuring seven more. The source of the fire that resulted in this terrible occurrence is yet unknown. Lt. Commander Kapish Singh Muwal and Lt. Commander Manoranjan Kumar were two of the officers who died while on duty. The Naval Ensign was lowered to half-mast as a solemn mark of remembrance for the fallen INS Sindhuratna crew.

General Characteristics:

The INS Sindhuratna (S59) is a Sindhughosh-class submarine with a submerged displacement of 3076 tonnes and a surface displacement of 2325 tonnes. The submarine has a sturdy design, measuring 72.6 metres in length, 9.9 metres in width, and 6.6 metres in depth. The propulsion system consists of two 3,650 hp diesel-electric motors, one 5,900 hp engine, two 204 hp auxiliary motors, and one 130 hp economical speed motor.

The INS Sindhuratna can reach speeds of 11 knots when surfaced, 9 knots in snorkel mode, and an astonishing 19 knots submerged. The submarine has a long range, capable of traversing 6,000 miles at 7 knots in snorting mode and 400 miles at 3 knots underwater. It can last up to 45 days with 52 people on board.

The submarine is capable of operating at depths ranging from 240 metres to 300 metres. The crew consists of 13 officers and 39 ratings. INS Sindhuratna’s armament includes a 9M36 Strela-3 (SA-N-8) SAM launcher, a Klub-S (3M-54E) ASCM, a Type 53-65 passive wake homing torpedo, and a TEST 71/76 anti-submarine active-passive homing torpedo. In addition, it can carry 24 DM-1 mines instead of torpedo tubes, increasing its ability to adapt in many marine settings.