INS Karanj (S23) commissioned: exploring the general characteristics and legacy of the Kalvari-class Diesel-Electric Submarine

In February 15, 2021, after it was launched, it was given to the Indian Navy. On March 10, 2021, in Mumbai, the Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Karambir Singh and Admiral (Retired) VS Shekhawat graced the commissioning event.

Six Kalvari-class submarines were originally commissioned for the Indian Navy, with INS Karanj (S23) being the third of them. This diesel-electric attack submarine is built on the Scorpène class design, which was a joint venture between the Indian shipyard Mazagon Dock Limited, located in Mumbai, and the French naval defence and energy corporation DCNS.

On January 31, 2018, the submarine, which was given the name INS Karanj, underwent an important milestone at its formal launch. On February 15, 2021, after it was launched, it was given to the Indian Navy. On March 10, 2021, in Mumbai, the Chief of Naval Staff Admiral Karambir Singh and Admiral (Retired) VS Shekhawat graced the commissioning event.

The INS Karanj (S23) is a notable tribute to INS Karanj (S21), the ship that preceded it and served in the Indian Navy from 1969 to 2003. The source of the naming tradition is Karanja Island, which is also known as Uran Island and is located in Maharashtra’s Raigad district. The name’s historical importance lends the newest member of the Indian Navy’s fleet a sense of continuity and reverence.

General Characteristics:

The submarine of the Kalvari class is 1,615 tonnes when it is surfaced and 1,775 tonnes when it is submerged. Its dimensions are 67.5 metres long, 6.2 metres wide, 12.3 metres tall, and 5.8 metres deep. The submarine is equipped with four MTU 12V 396 SE84 diesel engines, 360 battery cells, and a DRDO PAFC fuel cell for propulsion. During its mid-life upgrade, the submarine will also feature Air-Independent Propulsion (AIP). Its capabilities include a speed of 11 knots on the surface and 20 mph underwater, along with a range of 6,500 nautical miles at 8 knots on the surface and 550 nautical miles at 4 knots underwater.

The endurance-designed yacht has a 50-day operational range. A crew of eight officers and thirty-five sailors can be found aboard the 350-meter-deep test submarine of the Kalvari class. It has the C303/S anti-torpedo countermeasure equipment installed for electronic warfare and decoys.

The diverse armament of the Kalvari-class submarine includes six 533 mm torpedo tubes that may hold 18 SUT torpedoes or SM.39 Exocet anti-ship missiles. As an alternative, the submarine can be set up to carry thirty mines rather than torpedoes, demonstrating its tactical and strategic versatility. All things considered, the Kalvari-class submarine is a powerful addition to naval fleets, combining the latest innovations with an array of capabilities for a variety of marine activities.