Israeli Forces uncover Gaza tunnel used for hostages by Hamas

Rear Admiral Daniel Hagari emphasized that the tunnel was rigged with blast doors and explosives, underscoring the extreme measures taken by Hamas to conceal and protect their illicit activities.

In a recent operation, Israeli soldiers have uncovered a kilometre-long tunnel in the Gaza Strip, shedding light on the grim reality of Hamas’ activities in the region. The tunnel, discovered in the southern Gaza city of Khan Younis, had a booby-trapped entrance in the house of a Hamas member, according to military spokesman Rear Admiral Daniel Hagari.

Inside the tunnel, soldiers found a series of cramped cells that served as a holding area for hostages. The military estimates that approximately 20 hostages were kept there at different times, enduring harsh conditions that included limited daylight, dense air with low oxygen levels, and challenging humidity. The hostages, who were not present at the time of discovery, had reportedly been held during various periods, with some being released during a November truce mediated by Qatar.

The underground labyrinth comprised five narrow rooms enclosed by metal bars, equipped with basic facilities such as toilets and mattresses. Shockingly, among the artefacts found were drawings by a child hostage, providing a poignant glimpse into the suffering experienced within the tunnel.

Rear Admiral Daniel Hagari emphasized that the tunnel was rigged with blast doors and explosives, underscoring the extreme measures taken by Hamas to conceal and protect their illicit activities. The soldiers engaged in a battle with terrorists inside the tunnel, resulting in the elimination of the threat.

The military released photographs of the tunnel to document its existence before its subsequent destruction. Journalists were brought in to capture the evidence, further highlighting the severity of the situation.

This discovery comes amid heightened tensions between Israel and Hamas, with a recent focus on the Gaza Strip. The military has been actively combating the Palestinian Islamist group in the region, particularly in Khan Younis.

Hagari conveyed that, based on gathered testimonies, approximately 20 hostages had been subjected to harsh conditions within the tunnel at various intervals. He underscored the difficulties faced by the hostages, such as the absence of daylight, compromised air quality, and challenging humidity levels.