Israeli supreme court rejects Netanyahu’s judiciary power limitation in narrow 8-7 vote

Implemented since its enactment in July, the law removed the court’s ability to veto government decisions based on perceived “unreasonableness.” The amendment triggered mass protests and led thousands of army reservists to threaten work refusal.

Israel’s Supreme Court has invalidated a controversial government proposal aimed at curbing the authority of the judiciary. The court’s decision, with a narrow margin of eight votes to seven, rejected the proposed amendment to the reasonableness law—a crucial component of Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s strategy to diminish the judiciary’s power.

Implemented since its enactment in July, the law removed the court’s ability to veto government decisions based on perceived “unreasonableness.” The amendment triggered mass protests and led thousands of army reservists to threaten work refusal.

The Supreme Court’s majority decision, with an 8-7 vote, has effectively annulled this law which was enacted in July—a pivotal component of Prime Minister Netanyahu’s ambitious plan to overhaul the justice system. concerns about Netanyahu’s actions, suggesting that this move could open the door to potential corruption and improper appointment The now-invalidated law was designed to restrict judges from overturning government decisions that they deemed “unreasonable.” There were inadequately qualified individuals for crucial positions within the government.

As of now, Prime Minister Netanyahu has refrained from providing any public commentary on the Supreme Court’s ruling.

The overturned law, part of a broader initiative by Netanyahu to reshape the justice system, drew criticism for what some perceived as an attempt to undermine the judiciary’s independence.

The Supreme Court’s ruling serves as a check on executive power, affirming the judiciary’s role in upholding democratic principles.

The Supreme Court’s nullification of the amendment reignited a heated debate that had momentarily subsided following the October 7 attacks by Hamas.

Reactions to the court’s ruling varied among political figures. Defense Minister Yoav Gallant and opposition leader Benny Gantz, both part of Netanyahu’s war cabinet, cautiously supported the decision, emphasizing the need for unity amid the ongoing conflict. National Security Minister Itamar Ben-Gvir and Justice Minister Yariv Levin, criticized the ruling as illegal and detrimental to Israel’s war efforts.