North Korea demolishes symbolic Arch of Reunification; labels South Korea as “primary foe”

During a speech at the Supreme People’s Assembly on January 15, Kim referred to the monument as an “eyesore” and ordered amendments to the constitution, explicitly stating that the South is a “primary foe” and “principle enemy.”

North Korea has reportedly demolished a prominent monument in its capital, Pyongyang, that symbolized aspirations for reconciliation with South Korea. The Arch of Reunification, formally known as the Monument to the Three Charters for National Reunification, stood 30 meters tall and embodied hopes for Korean unity. Satellite imagery from Tuesday revealed its absence, indicating its demolition on the orders of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

This development follows Kim Jong Un’s declaration last week, wherein he labelled South Korea as a “primary foe” and asserted that reunification was no longer feasible. During a speech at the Supreme People’s Assembly on January 15, Kim referred to the monument as an “eyesore” and ordered amendments to the constitution, explicitly stating that the South is a “primary foe” and “principle enemy.”

The Arch of Reunification held great significance, representing the three charters of self-reliance, peace, and national cooperation, according to South Korean government records. Its destruction raises concerns about the shifting dynamics on the Korean peninsula, especially amid escalating tensions fueled by military manoeuvres by South Korea and the United States in response to North Korea’s weapons testing. The North has even gone as far as expressing readiness for a nuclear war.

The international community is closely monitoring these developments. White House spokesperson John Kirby commented on North Korea’s potential shift in posture, stating, “We’re watching this very, very closely.” Despite the uncertainty, Kirby expressed confidence in the defensive posture maintained on the peninsula, emphasizing its appropriateness in the face of perceived risks.

South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol, who assumed office in 2022, has consistently adopted a firm stance against North Korea, advocating for immediate and robust responses to its military actions. The North’s vow to “wipe out” South Korea in the event of an attack, coupled with the annulment of a key 2018 agreement aimed at de-escalating military tensions, underscores the gravity of the situation.

In a further indication of North Korea’s strategic shift, key government agencies integral to decades of exchanges with Seoul were abolished following Kim’s recent speech. As the region grapples with these developments, the international community remains on high alert, navigating the delicate balance of diplomacy in the Korean peninsula’s geopolitical landscape.