Pakistan Air Force upgrades Global-6000 into Electronic Warfare Aircraft with Turkish assistance

The converted Global-6000 will be equipped to perform three core electronic warfare (EW) missions: radar jamming, communications jamming, and electronic intelligence (ELINT).

The Pakistan Air Force (PAF) has announced plans to convert its lone Bombardier Global-6000 jet into a stand-off jamming (SOJ) aircraft, in collaboration with Turkish Aerospace Industries (TAI). This initiative aims to enhance the PAF’s offensive capabilities, as reported by media sources.

The converted Global-6000 will be equipped to perform three core electronic warfare (EW) missions: radar jamming, communications jamming, and electronic intelligence (ELINT). The radar jamming capability will utilize transceivers to disrupt enemy radars by recording their transmission frequencies and re-transmitting them using the same signal. In the ELINT role, the aircraft will monitor enemy radar and communications transmissions, recording the information into a ‘threat library’ for future electronic countermeasures (ECM) tasks.

While the specific electronic warfare suite to be installed on the Global-6000 has not been confirmed, there is speculation that the Aselsan HAVASOJ system could be considered. TAI is configuring around four Global-6000s with the HAVASOJ suite for the Turkish Air Force. However, the PAF may also explore other vendors to customize an EW suite tailored to its specific requirements.

The decision to enhance its electronic warfare capabilities comes amid growing concerns within the PAF about potential threats posed by India’s modernized air force. The PAF anticipates facing more advanced Indian aircraft, such as the Tejas MK-1A, equipped with an active electronically scanned array (AESA) radar and an advanced EW/ECM suite. Additionally, the Indian Air Force (IAF) operates the Dassault Rafale, upgraded Sukhoi Su-30MKI, and a range of advanced surface-to-air missiles (SAM), significantly increasing the threat level faced by the PAF.

Furthermore, India’s integrated air defence system, comprising advanced medium-range and long-range SAMs, poses a significant challenge to PAF aircraft operating near the border. The IAF’s ability to network these assets together into a coordinated counter-response represents a significant advancement in India’s air defence capabilities.

In response to these challenges, the PAF’s decision to upgrade its Global-6000 into an electronic warfare aircraft is aimed at enhancing its ability to operate effectively in contested airspace. The converted aircraft will provide the PAF with enhanced situational awareness and the capability to disrupt and degrade enemy radar and communications systems, thereby improving its survivability and mission effectiveness in future operations.