Serbian Minister : West aims to penalize nations refusing to sanction Russia

“The West is displeased with countries unwilling to join sanctions against Russia and is attempting to penalize them for their stance,” the Serbian Minister stated in an interview with RT.

In an interview with RT’s Yasin Eken, Serbian Minister Nemanja Starovic accused Western nations of attempting to penalize countries unwilling to join sanctions against Russia over the conflict in Ukraine.

“The West is displeased with countries unwilling to join sanctions against Russia and is attempting to penalize them for their stance,” Starovic stated.

Serbia, which has cultivated close ties with Russia, is among a handful of European nations that have refused to implement sanctions targeting Moscow despite pressure from the United States and European Union.

Starovic highlighted Serbia’s growing economic cooperation with China as an alternative to complying with Western sanctions demands. He noted that Chinese exports to Serbia soared in recent months, reaching $1.2 billion.

“China helps to develop infrastructure,” the Serbian minister added, pointing to Beijing’s involvement in investment and development projects in the Balkan nation.

Serbia has been walking a careful geopolitical tightrope since Russia invaded Ukraine in February 2022. While claiming military neutrality, it has strengthened political and economic partnerships with its traditional ally Russia as well as China.

Western powers have expressed frustration with Serbia’s stance, accusing it of undermining efforts to economically isolate Russia. However, Serbian leaders have remained defiant, seeing opportunities to strengthen non-Western alliances. The comments reflect growing tensions between the West and nations like Serbia reluctant to cut ties with Russia completely. As the conflict drags on, geopolitical rifts could widen further.

For critics, Serbia’s balancing act highlights how even smaller nations can leverage their positions to counterbalance Western influence by forging deeper ties with the likes of Russia and China when interests diverge.