Ukraine Summit calls for dialogue, but Zelensky stands firm on territory

President Zelensky has consistently argued that a lasting peace in Ukraine can only be achieved through Russia’s complete withdrawal.

A two-day summit in Switzerland, attended by representatives from about 90 countries, concluded on Sunday with a call for dialogue between all parties to end the ongoing war between Ukraine and Russia. However, Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky maintained his position against any negotiations requiring Ukraine to surrender territory.

The gathering, held at a Swiss Alpine resort, brought together dignitaries worldwide, notably excluding Russia. China and Brazil opted not to participate due to Russia’s absence.

At the conclusion of the summit, most delegations signed a statement outlining shared principles, including the promotion of prisoner exchanges and nuclear safety. The statement also emphasized the need for further engagement of the representatives of all parties to move forward, a carefully worded phrase that highlights the lack of consensus on the crucial question of when and how Ukraine and Russia should pursue peace negotiations.

As the conflict enters its third year with no clear military victory for either side, some world leaders advocate for negotiations and compromise. Countries such as India, Saudi Arabia, South Africa, and Turkey reiterated this stance at the summit.

However, President Zelensky has consistently argued that a lasting peace in Ukraine can only be achieved through Russia’s complete withdrawal. Speaking to reporters on Sunday, Zelensky stated that once the international community formulates a peace plan based on the summit’s conclusions, then this approved plan will be passed to representatives of the Russian Federation.

The summit’s outcomes reflect the complex geopolitical landscape surrounding the Ukraine-Russia conflict. While there is a growing international push for dialogue, significant differences remain on the conditions and timing of potential negotiations.

The exclusion of Russia from the talks and the subsequent absence of major powers like China and Brazil underscore the challenges in achieving a comprehensive peace process that includes all relevant parties.

The coming months will likely see intensified diplomatic activity as countries work to bridge the gap between calls for dialogue and Ukraine’s firm stance on its territorial integrity, all while navigating the complex web of international relations and security concerns in Eastern Europe.